(What was MAME programmed in? May I have the source code?)
(Hey, emulate this game!)
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==Hey, emulate this game!==
 
==Hey, emulate this game!==
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Please keep in mind that MAME is the work of hundreds of volunteers. These volunteers dedicate many many hours of their lives to working on the project, and they do so because they are doing something they really enjoy. One of the big reasons working on MAME is enjoyable is because it is not a job, and nobody is telling anyone else what to do or what to work on. In fact, attempting to tell the MAME developers what to do often makes working on that game much less appealing, because it starts to feel like a job.
 +
 +
Because MAME has been around for over 10 years, almost all of the easy work is complete. Most everything that remains unemulated is due to some very difficult issues. If your favorite game is not yet emulated, the best thing you can do is sit back and wait. Nagging, complaining, or otherwise asking what is happening is not going to make emulation happen any faster, and may in fact hinder further progress.
 +
 
==I found a bug, what do I do?==
 
==I found a bug, what do I do?==
 
==Why don't the devs fix old games instead of adding new ones?==
 
==Why don't the devs fix old games instead of adding new ones?==

Revision as of 05:24, 1 August 2007

Return to the main Frequently Asked Questions page.

Can I contribute anything to the MAME project?

What was MAME programmed in? May I have the source code?

MAME is programmed in portable, modular and mostly readable C code. The source is always freely available -- the license requires this -- and you can compile your own version to suit your needs with minimal hassle. The Windows version is currently compiled using MinGW, a minimalist port of the GNU C Compiler to Windows. Please see the Development Tools page for more details.

Please note that although the source can be modified, it is requested that you read and understand the About MAME page, which lists some minimal guidelines for derivative builds.

Hey, emulate this game!

Please keep in mind that MAME is the work of hundreds of volunteers. These volunteers dedicate many many hours of their lives to working on the project, and they do so because they are doing something they really enjoy. One of the big reasons working on MAME is enjoyable is because it is not a job, and nobody is telling anyone else what to do or what to work on. In fact, attempting to tell the MAME developers what to do often makes working on that game much less appealing, because it starts to feel like a job.

Because MAME has been around for over 10 years, almost all of the easy work is complete. Most everything that remains unemulated is due to some very difficult issues. If your favorite game is not yet emulated, the best thing you can do is sit back and wait. Nagging, complaining, or otherwise asking what is happening is not going to make emulation happen any faster, and may in fact hinder further progress.

I found a bug, what do I do?

Why don't the devs fix old games instead of adding new ones?